Check out MHS’s online seminar with 2021 Whitehill Prize winner Cornelia H. Dayton!

Professor Cornelia H. Dayton will present her essay “Lost Years Recovered: John Peters and Phillis Wheatley Peters in Middleton” at a Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar at the Massachusetts Historical Society on Tuesday, September 21 at 5:15pm EDT.

From MHS:

Litigation in Essex County reveals where the African-born poet Phillis Wheatley Peters and her husband John Peters went when they left Boston for three years starting in spring 1780. Peters came into possession of a substantial farm where he had been enslaved as a child. But his tenuous legal position and the hostility of many townspeople led to his eventually losing the land and deciding to move the family back to Boston. Panelists will discuss the implications of these new findings, the future research pathways they suggest, and investigative methods that expand our awareness of Black lives in the late eighteenth-century northeast. Attendees are invited to read the recently published article by Dayton that delineates the complicated litigation record. 

Submissions are Open for the 2021 Whitehill Prize

The Colonial Society of Massachusetts has announced the 2021 Walter Muir Whitehill Prize in Early American History competition for essays on early American history (up to 1825), not previously published, with preference being given to New England subjects. 

Essays are now being accepted for consideration. All manuscripts submitted for the 2021 prize must be emailed or postmarked no later than January 15, 2022. The Society expects to announce the winning candidate in the spring of 2022.

Volume 94.3: September 2021

The New England Quarterly announces the publication of Volume 94.3: September 2021.

Editorial
by Jonathan Chu

In Memoriam: Robert L. Middlekauff (1929–2021)
by Ruth Bloch

2020 Whitehill Prize

Lost Years Recovered: John Peters and Phillis Wheatley Peters in Middleton
by Cornelia H. Dayton

Essays

Roger Williams and the Indian Business
by Julie A. Fisher

“The Presence of Improper Females”: Reforming Theater in Boston and Providence, 1820s–1840s
by Sara E. Lampert

Memoranda and Documents

Author, Author: A Short Story of the Rise, reign, and ruine of the Late Antinomians, Familists, and Libertines (1644) Reappraised
by David D. Hall

Review Essay

Thomas Hutchinson and Vernacular Constitutionalism
by Peter C. Messer

Book Reviews

Hidden Places: Maine Writers on Coastal Villages, Mill Towns, and the North Country. By Joseph A Conforti
by Susan F. Beegel

Gateways to Empire: Quebec and New Amsterdam to 1664. By Daniel Weeks
by Marine Julia van Ittersum

Criminal Dissent: Prosecutions Under the Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798. By Wendell Bird
by Thomas C. Mackey

American Intelligence: Small-Town News and Political Culture in Federalist New Hampshire. By Ben P. Lafferty
by Richard C. Rohrs

Collecting the Globe: The Salem East India Marine Society Museum. By George H. Schwartz
by Rachel Tamar Van

The Course of God’s Providence: Religion, Health, and the Body in Early America. By Philippa Koch
by Olivia Weisser

Political Godmother: Nackey Scripps Loeb and the Newspaper that Shook the Republican Party. By Meg Heckman
by Michael J. Birkner

The Colonial Society of Massachusetts Announces the 2020 Walter Muir Whitehill Prize in Early American History

csm-volume82-title

This prize, established in memory of Walter Muir Whitehill, for many years Editor of Publications for the Colonial Society and the moving force behind the organization, will be awarded for a distinguished essay on early American history (up to 1825), not previously published. The Society hopes that the prize may be awarded annually.

A committee of eminent historians will review the essays. Their decision in all cases will be final.

By arrangement with the editors of The New England Quarterly, the winning essay will be published in an appropriate issue of the journal.

Essays are now being accepted for consideration. All manuscripts submitted for the 2020 prize must be postmarked no later than January 15, 2021. The Society expects to announce the winning candidate in the spring of 2021.

Entries submitted for consideration should be addressed to:

Whitehill Prize Committee
c/o The New England Quarterly
Department of History
University of Massachusetts, Boston
100 Morrissey Blvd.
Boston, MA 02125

For additional information, including prize specifications and a list of past winners, see here.

The Colonial Society of Massachusetts Announces the 2019 Walter Muir Whitehill Prize in Early American History

February 28, 2019: 

This prize of two thousand five hundred dollars, established in memory of Walter Muir Whitehill, for many years Editor of Publications for the Colonial Society and the moving force behind the organization, will be awarded for a distinguished essay on early American history (up to 1825), not previously published, with preference being given to New England subjects. The Society hopes that the prize may be awarded annually.

A committee of eminent historians will review the essays. Their decision in all cases will be final.

By arrangement with the editors of The New England Quarterly, the Society will have the winning essay published in an appropriate issue of the journal.

Essays are now being accepted for consideration. All manuscripts submitted for the 2019 prize must be postmarked no later than December 31, 2019. The Society expects to announce the winning candidate in the spring of 2020.

Entries submitted for consideration should be addressed to:

Whitehill Prize Committee
c/o The New England Quarterly
Department of History
University of Massachusetts, Boston
100 Morrissey Blvd.
Boston, MA 02125

Click here for more information including judging criteria, submission specifications, and past winners.