Check out MHS’s online seminar with 2021 Whitehill Prize winner Cornelia H. Dayton!

Professor Cornelia H. Dayton will present her essay “Lost Years Recovered: John Peters and Phillis Wheatley Peters in Middleton” at a Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar at the Massachusetts Historical Society on Tuesday, September 21 at 5:15pm EDT.

From MHS:

Litigation in Essex County reveals where the African-born poet Phillis Wheatley Peters and her husband John Peters went when they left Boston for three years starting in spring 1780. Peters came into possession of a substantial farm where he had been enslaved as a child. But his tenuous legal position and the hostility of many townspeople led to his eventually losing the land and deciding to move the family back to Boston. Panelists will discuss the implications of these new findings, the future research pathways they suggest, and investigative methods that expand our awareness of Black lives in the late eighteenth-century northeast. Attendees are invited to read the recently published article by Dayton that delineates the complicated litigation record. 

Remembering Professor Bernard Bailyn

The Library of America celebrated the life of our dear friend Professor Bernard Bailyn with a conversation among three eminent historians: Gordon S. Wood of Brown University, Richard D. Brown of the University of Connecticut and President of New England Quarterly, Inc., and Robert J. Allison of Suffolk University. You can read their conversation here.

Image courtesy of Julia Malakie/Associated Press.

Check out recent author Adrain Chastain Weimer’s blogpost!

Adrian Chastain Weimer writes for the Massachusetts Historical Society blog on “Elijah’s Mantle & its Annotations: A Source for Puritan Constitutionalism” Check out the blog here.

Weimer’s related article, “The Resistance Petitions of 1664–1665: Confronting the Restoration in Massachusetts Bay,” appears in the June 2019 issue of the New England Quarterly.

Read Weimer’s NEQ article here, free for the next two months!